[Do It Yourself] How to Repair Your Washing Machine

Written by on January 22, 2020

Washing machine is the machine used to wash the various types of clothes without applying any physical efforts. With washing machine you don’t have to rub the clothes with hand or squeeze them to remove the water from them.

Common Problems and Troubleshooting steps of a Washing Machine

1.     Washing Machine Will Not Start

It is the most basic of all washing machine breakdowns: the machine will not start. You have put the clothes in the washing machine basin, pressed the “On” button or turned the dial, and then nothing happens.

TRY THE FOLLOWING

  1. Check the power cord behind the washer to make sure that it is plugged in. Due to washers’ vigorous movements, especially when the load is imbalanced, machines may move. When a machine moves, it may inadvertently unplug the power cord. Cords that have been shortened with ties have no give. In this case, untie the cord to allow for more flexibility.
  • Is the circuit breaker to the washer flipped off? To reset a circuit breaker, find the electrical service panel. Locate the correct circuit breaker, flip it in the “Off” direction, and then back to the “On” position.
  • Your front loader washer’s lid switch strike may be faulty. This is the area of the door frame that communicates to the machine that the door is properly closed and it is okay to begin filling with water. Close the lid and watch as the part on the door connects with the part on the machine. The top part should seat into the bottom part.
  • Your top loader washer’s lid switch may be faulty. You can test this by setting the machine to “On” and then pushing into the hole with the blunt end of a pen. If working correctly, the water should begin filling even though the lid is open.

2.     Washing Machine Does Not Adequately Clean the Clothes

This may be one of the more frustrating clothes washer problems because you notice it only after running the clothes through a full cycle. After washing your clothing, you remove it and find your supposedly clean clothes covered in lint, hair, and other light debris.

TRY THE FOLLOWING

  • Avoid overloading your washer. An overly full washer does not have enough space for the clean rinse water to pull out the detergent and debris. Consult your owner’s manual for specific load maximums.

 

  • Use less detergent. Too much detergent can redeposit lint and other debris back on the clothing, rather than pulling it out.

 

  • Wash pet-related items such as blankets, cat and dog beds, and chew toys separately from the rest of the clothing. If the pet load is especially dirty, clean the washing machine tub by hand after the wash.

3.     Washing Machine Will Not Spin

With this all-too-common washing machine problem, the basin has drained of water but it refuses to spin. Spinning at a high rate of speed is the action that squeezes water out of the clothing so that it can be dried in the dryer.

TRY THE FOLLOWING

  • Try to redistribute the clothing within the washing machine tub. When the washer is out of balance, it will automatically stop until you can get the clothing back in balance. After redistributing the clothing, close the lid again. The machine should start spinning automatically if the load distribution is correct. Loads that include high-absorption materials like towels, sheets, and thick clothing like jeans and sweaters often become imbalanced.
  • Check the machine’s level on the floor. An out-of-level machine will stop spinning; this action is programmed into your clothes washer for safety. Check the machine’s level with a bubble level and bring the machine back to level by adjusting the legs.
  • Check the drainage and the drain hose. Small items may clog up the machine’s drainage system. You may be able to check the washer’s drain pump without removing it. Finally, the drainage hose that leads from the back of the machine to a drainage point may be clogged.

4.     Washing Machine Fills With Water But Will Not Drain

Many homeowners have had the unpleasant experience of lifting the washing machine lid, only to discover clothes floating in a tub filled with murky gray water. If you catch the machine early enough, the water is still hot or lukewarm.

TRY THE FOLLOWING

  • Your machine’s pump may be clogged with a piece of fabric or some other item related to washing. Bail the water out with a kitchen measuring cup and then unplug the machine. Take off the screws on the front panel. Tilt the machine up and prop the front of the machine on two-by-fours or bricks for easier access. Your machine’s pump housing may be easily visible, making it simple to assess whether you have a clog in the pump. If so, use pliers to gently untwist the clog from the pump.
  • Alternatively, the clog may be located in the corrugated tube that leads to the pump. Unclamp the tube. Have a bucket or bin nearby, because this tube will be filled with water. Drain the water. If there is a clog in the hose, it will usually be at the end of the hose. Pull it out by hand or with pliers.

 

 



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